History

The Rutland Railroad has its roots in the Champlain and Connecticut River Railroad, created in 1843. This railroad became the Rutland & Burlington, and eventually grew into the Rutland Railroad. It was leased by the Vermont Central/Central Vermont and also came under brief control of the Deleware & Hudson, before being bought by New York Central interests and expanded. That expansion started in 1898 after shares were bought out by Percival W. Clement. For more detailed history of the original Rutland Railroad up to 1902 (Rutland & Burlington), click here.

The Rutland chartered the Rutland & Canadian Railroad to build north from Burlington, Vermont, to Canada and connect the Rutland with the Ogdensburg & Lake Champlain in Alburgh, Vermont. For more detailed history of the Rutland & Canadian Railroad and it’s origins, click here.

The Ogdensburg & Lake Champlain was a railroad that had been controlled by the Vermont Central/Central Vermont and cut loose in the Central Vermont’s 1896 bankruptcy. The Rutland purchased the OLC in 1899. For more detailed history of the Ogdensburg & Lake Champlain Railroad and it’s origins, click here.

The Rutland & Noyan was chartered by the Rutland Railroad to build from Alburgh, Vermont into Southern Quebec, connecting with the Quebec Southern at Noyan, Quebec. For more detailed history of the Rutland & Noyan Railroad, click here.

The Addison Railroad was chartered in the 1850’s and that charter was resurrected by the Rutland and Burlington to build from Leicester Junction, Vermont to Ticonderoga, New York. The line was then leased by the Rutland & Burlington in 1870 for a period of 99 Years. For more detailed history of the Addison Railroad and it’s origins, click here.

The Chatham & Lebanon Valley was the last iteration of a long line of companies that fought for traffic between New York City and northern points. Running from Chatham, New York to Bennington, Vermont, the line was nicknamed “The Corkscrew” due to the profile of the line. It was purchased by the Rutland in 1901. For more detailed history of the Chatham & Lebanon Valley Railroad and it’s origins, click here.

The Bennington & Rutland Railroad connected Rutland, Vermont with Bennington, in the south-west corner of the state. The Chatham & Lebanon Valley connected with Bennington, as such it made this line important for New York City traffic the Rutland sought. The line was purchased in 1899. For more detailed history of the Bennington & Rutland Railroad and it’s origins, click here.

By 1902, the Rutland Railroad had reached its zenith at 413 miles, running from Ogdensburg, New York to Bellows Falls, Vermont, with lines to Chatham, New York and to Montreal, Quebec.

Control passed to the New York Central, which then traded half-ownership (but no control) to the New York, New Haven & Hartford in exchange for half-ownership of the New York, Ontario & Western. The Rutland was operated as part of the New York Central System, with locomotives, rolling stock and facilities patterned off of New York Central standard designs.

The Rutland was pushed into bankruptcy in 1938 by creditors, and was in receivership for nearly 12 years until reorganizing that the Rutland Railway in 1950. For more detailed history of the Rutland Railroad between 1902 and 1950, click here.

The Rutland Railway operated until formally abandoned in 1963. For more detailed history of the Rutland Railway and the strike period from 1960-62, click here.

After the sale of most of the railroad assets of the Rutland Railway, the company was renamed in 1964 to The Rutland Corporation. The company owned real estate (formerly railroad land) and purchased other companies with the monies received from the sale of railroad assets. The Rutland Corporation was purchased in 1968 and was integrated into the Walter Reede Company, thus ending 125 years of the Rutland and its predecessors.